PVOP Goes to Philly "FRINGE"

We're been pretty busy, but never too bust for the arts. The Philadelphia Voices of Pride has the honor to perform in two (yes TWO) Fringe Festival performances! Philly FRINGE is a fabulous and inexpensive way to not only experience arts and music in the the city of Brotherly Love, but is an amazing way get involved in the arts yourself. 

Be sure to check us out this FRINGE as we collaborate with John Jarboe of The Bearded Ladies and Martha Grahm Cracker in two must-see events this season. Be there, or be sad you missed out.

Tickets Will SELL OUT to both shows. So don't hesitate. Buy yours today!

See us perform with John Jarboe!

Check out the Facebook event page HERE: https://www.facebook.com/events/1067312936697835/



See us perform with Martha Grahm Cracker

  Performing with the one and only Martha Graham Cracker at the Martha Graham Cracker Cabaret: Festival Closing Night Bash last night, September 24th, 2016. — at Fringearts

 

Performing with the one and only Martha Graham Cracker at the Martha Graham Cracker Cabaret: Festival Closing Night Bash last night, September 24th, 2016. — at Fringearts

Check out the Facebook event page HERE: https://www.facebook.com/events/948281111967597/

"Winter's Glow" - PVOP 2016 Winter Concert

"Winter's Glow"

So we're doing our first EVER holiday concert and we couldn't be more excited! Please join us as we ring in all the holiday fuzzy feeling with this spectacular winter program. And did we mention our special guest stars John Jarboe and Men on Tap? Well, we just did.
You won't want to miss this! 

Saturday, December 10, 2016.
Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral
8pm Show | 7pm VIP Experience begins (Must have tickets to participate)


Tickets: TBD
Available Soon.
 

SPRING 2016 Concert: "The Armed Man" | The meaning behind the music

Karl Jenkins

Press Quotes:  "In a rapturous performance, by turns visceral and ethereal, the Mass was a firebomb of orchestral and human voices."

- The Times

Source: http://www.boosey.com/pages/cr/catalogue/cat_detail.asp?musicid=3561

THE ARMED MAN- A Mass for Peace

The meaning behind the music

The Mass begins with a marching army and the beat of military drums, the orchestra gradually building to the choir’s entrance, singing the 15th-century theme tune – The Armed Man. After the scene is set, the style and pace changes and we are prepared for reflection by first the Moslem Call to Prayer (Adhaan) and then the Kyrie, which pays homage to the past by quoting (in the Christe Eleison) from Palestrina’s setting of L’Homme Armé. Next, to a plainsong setting, we hear words from the Psalms asking for God’s help against our enemies. The Sanctus that follows is full of menace, and has a primeval, tribal character that adds to its power. The menace grows in the next movement as Kipling’s Hymn Before Action builds to its final devastating line “Lord grant us strength to die.”

 

War is now inevitable. Charge opens with a seductive paean to martial glory which is followed by the inevitable consequence – war in all its uncontrolled cacophony of destruction, then the eerie silence of the battlefield after the battle and, finally, the burial of the dead. Surely nothing can be worse than this? But think again. At the very centre of the work is Angry Flames, an excerpt from a poem about the horrors of the atom bomb attack on Hiroshima written by a poet who was there at the time and died in 1953 of leukemia brought on by exposure to radiation. But if we think that the obscenity of this mass destruction is new to our consciousness, we must reconsider as we listen, to the eerily similar passage from the ancient Indian epic The Mahàbharàta. 

From the horror of mass destruction the work turns to remember that one death is one too many, that each human life is sacred and unique. First the Agnus Dei, with its lyrical chorale theme, reminds us of Christ’s ultimate sacrifice and this is followed by an elegiac setting of some lines I wrote (to accompany one of the dramatic interpretations we use in the museum) about the feelings of loss and guilt that so many of the survivors of the First World War felt when they came home but their friends did not.

Even the survivors can be hurt to destruction by war. The Benedictus heals those wounds in its slow and stately affirmation of faith and leads us to the final, positive, climax of the work. This begins back where we started in the 15th century with Lancelot and Guinevere’s declaration, born of bitter experience, that peace is better than war. The menace of the ‘Armed Man’ theme returns and vies for a time with Malory’s desire for peace. But time moves on and we come to our moment of commitment. Do we want the new millennium to be like the last? Or do we join with Tennyson when he tells us to “Ring out the thousand wars of old, Ring in the thousand years of peace”? It may seem an impossible dream, we may not have begun too well, but the Mass ends with the affirmation from Revelations that change is possible, that sorrow, pain and death can be overcome. Dona nobis pacem.

Programme note by Guy Wilson, former Master of the Armouries

TICKET PRICING:

  • VIP Experience: $40
    Includes FREE RECEPTION-- wine bar and light fair at 7pm (1 hr before concert) and premium  seating. Tickets also available at the door

  • General Admissions: $25
    Tickets Available Online and At the Door

  • Student Admissions*: $10  (DOORS SALES ONLY)
    Tickets NOT Available Online. 
    Must present valid student I.D. upon admission

BUY TICKETS HERE   (<- click the link)

Programme Note  

The Mass begins with a marching army and the beat of military drums, the orchestra gradually building to the choir’s entrance, singing the 15th-century theme tune – The Armed Man. After the scene is set, the style and pace changes and we are prepared for reflection by first the Moslem Call to Prayer (Adhaan) and then the Kyrie, which pays homage to the past by quoting (in the Christe Eleison) from Palestrina’s setting of L’Homme Armé. Next, to a plainsong setting, we hear words from the Psalms asking for God’s help against our enemies. The Sanctus that follows is full of menace, and has a primeval, tribal character that adds to its power. The menace grows in the next movement as Kipling’s Hymn Before Action builds to its final devastating line “Lord grant us strength to die.”

 

War is now inevitable. Charge opens with a seductive paean to martial glory which is followed by the inevitable consequence – war in all its uncontrolled cacophony of destruction, then the eerie silence of the battlefield after the battle and, finally, the burial of the dead. Surely nothing can be worse than this? But think again. At the very centre of the work is Angry Flames, an excerpt from a poem about the horrors of the atom bomb attack on Hiroshima written by a poet who was there at the time and died in 1953 of leukemia brought on by exposure to radiation. But if we think that the obscenity of this mass destruction is new to our consciousness, we must reconsider as we listen, to the eerily similar passage from the ancient Indian epic The Mahàbharàta. 

From the horror of mass destruction the work turns to remember that one death is one too many, that each human life is sacred and unique. First the Agnus Dei, with its lyrical chorale theme, reminds us of Christ’s ultimate sacrifice and this is followed by an elegiac setting of some lines I wrote (to accompany one of the dramatic interpretations we use in the museum) about the feelings of loss and guilt that so many of the survivors of the First World War felt when they came home but their friends did not.

Even the survivors can be hurt to destruction by war. The Benedictus heals those wounds in its slow and stately affirmation of faith and leads us to the final, positive, climax of the work. This begins back where we started in the 15th century with Lancelot and Guinevere’s declaration, born of bitter experience, that peace is better than war. The menace of the ‘Armed Man’ theme returns and vies for a time with Malory’s desire for peace. But time moves on and we come to our moment of commitment. Do we want the new millennium to be like the last? Or do we join with Tennyson when he tells us to “Ring out the thousand wars of old, Ring in the thousand years of peace”? It may seem an impossible dream, we may not have begun too well, but the Mass ends with the affirmation from Revelations that change is possible, that sorrow, pain and death can be overcome. Dona nobis pacem.

Programme note by Guy Wilson, former Master of the Armouries

 

 

 

AUDITIONS!!! Karl Jenkins', THE ARMED MAN - A Mass for Peace (not general chorus auditions)

Be a part of Our 10th Anniversary by singing a featured piece with us!

Fellow singers, choral members, songstresses and vocal performers...

BE A PART OF HISTORY

DON'T MISS OUT on this exciting opportunity to sing the infamous and invigorating Karl Jenkins, The Armed Man, a concert-length piece accompanied by Prometheus Chamber Orchestra!

Join us, the Philadelphia Voices of Pride, as we celebrate our 10th anniversary season by performing Karl Jenkins’, The Armed Man (A Mass for Peace). We will be joining forces with the groundbreaking, Prometheus Chamber Orchestra, at the stunning Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral to present a much-needed Mass for Peace. Auditions: Wednesday 2/17 at 7:30pm - 10pm  -or-   Sunday 2/21 at 1pm to 2:30pm

(more details below) 

The Philadelphia Voices of Pride is the only self-affirming LGBTQ (and Ally), mixed-voice chorus in Philadelphia, which has performed at various functions, including Speaking Out for Equality at the National Constitution Center, the It Gets Better Tour presented at the Kimmel Center, and have opened for the Philadelphia Phillies twice. We have been featured in well-known publications such as GPhilly, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and the Philadelphia Gay News.

DETAILS

Auditions: Wednesday 2/17 at 7:30pm - 10pm  -or-   Sunday 2/21 at 1pm to 2:30pm

Concert: May 21, 2016 at 8pm

To auditions for this concert piece, contact pvopmembership@gmail.com for more details

Sound Clip (The Armed Man): https://youtu.be/ezFNIyyGT2o

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